Google to Wish Happy New Year in its Unique Way

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Google to Wish Happy New Year in its Unique Way

Google is known for observing historic events across the year in its own unique style by coming up with stylish and interactive doodle. This time, it has gone all the way to become more creative and has come with a doodle to mark New Year's Eve 2013.

While revealing about the new doodle that Google has come up with, it has been revealed that it has come up with a collection of 35 doodles that have appeared in 2012. All the doodles ranging from the London 2012 Olympics doodles to Gideon Sundback's 132nd Birthday, one will see the assortment of the doodles.

One will not be able to read about each and every doodle, but will also be able to press on the doodle to go back to the specific page. It seems to be taking back into the realm of memories.

Some changes have also been made in the logo of the Google. Though the logo will remain in same colors that are Blue, Red, Yellow, and Green, in the centre of the table, there will be a table. The table will be having food and drinks indicating about New Year's Party.

The changes will not be witnessed in India's home page, due to sensitivity and commotion revolving around due to Delhi gang rape case.

 


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