Health Canada Limits Caffeine Content in Energy Drinks

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Health Canada is going to bring some changes in order to reformulate energy drinks. It has been found that Health Canada is going to limit the amount of caffeine to be used in energy drinks from February.

Not only caffeine, but other contents as well like vitamins, amino acids and minerals will also get restricted in energy drinks. Out of 96 reclassified drinks, 28 drinks have been asked to reformulate the same, so that they can meet the new requirements.

As per new limits, caffeine should not be present more than 180 mg, but all the drinks that have been asked for change, have more than allowed caffeine quantity. "When setting the 180 mg limit, we looked for a level that would not represent a risk, based on expected consumption patterns for these drinks", said Sean Upton, who is spokesman of Health Canada.

Some of the other changes that will be required by the drink companies to fulfill is to provide an annual data of drinks consumption, sales and incidents with regard to it. In addition, companies will be provided with only temporary authorization, which will continue for next five years.

When asked from Stephanie Baxter, who is the spokeswoman of Canadian Beverage Association about changes that will take place from February then Baxter refused to comment.

 


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