Infancy Economy Highly Connected to Teen Felony, Says Study


Infancy Economy Highly Connected to Teen Felony, Says Study

A panel of researchers at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University has come up with bizarre findings recently. It has been claiming that if high unemployment rates are suffered by one during infancy, these may lead to subsequent behavioral problems in later life.

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 data was analyzed by Seethalakshmi Ramanathan and colleagues to see the relationship shared between the high unemployment rates and that of use of subsequent adolescent substance and delinquent behaviors. Unemployment rates during recession in the 1980 and 1981-1982 as well as after the same were considered.

It was found that both had a strong link. The team says that the US teens tended to have higher rates of adolescent drinking and smoking and even of arrests and thefts if they had faced macroeconomic conditions in their first year of life.

The study included some 8,984 adolescents, who had taken birth from Jan. 1, 1980 to Dec. 31, 1984. It is being said that probably everyone is affected if seen at national level. "This finding suggests that unfavorable economic conditions during infancy may create circumstances that can affect the psychological development of the infant", said the study researchers.


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