Blood Thinners in Use to Break Clinton’s Blood Clot

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Blood Thinners in Use to Break Clinton’s Blood Clot

Hillary Clinton is admitted in hospital where she is being treated for blood clot that is present in a vein that is behind right ear. The vein is the same, which is responsible for carrying away blood from brain.

It was on Saturday when Clinton was admitted to hospital. She had undergone necessary tests, which revealed about the clot and she was admitted immediately. Doctors are providing blood thinners in order to dissolve blood clot.

Doctors at New York-Presbyterian Hospital said Clinton has been making healthy improvements. "In all other aspects of her recovery, the Secretary is making excellent progress and we are confident she will make a full recovery. She is in good spirits", said Doctors Lisa Bardack and Gigi El-Bayoumi.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta said there are not many complexities in the case of Clinton, as there are other nerves, which can take the blood from brain. So, there are no chances of blood getting built up in the brain.

It has been revealed that blood thinners are in use to treat clot. Clinton will remain under observation for months and till the time, the clot breaks down. Her anti-clotting medication is also going on, said Dr. Gupta.


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