Brits Unaware of What’s Bad in Their Food

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Brits Unaware of What’s Bad in Their Food

A recent survey has shown that people in England are unaware of bad contents of their food that can harm them significantly.

The research derived its results from about 2,000 adults who participated in the Food IQ Quiz. It was found that about 77% of the participants scored less than 50% and therefore, they concluded that people have no idea about what their food is comprised of, especially the bad part.

The survey was supported by the Department of Health's Change4Life Campaign and it showed that still people don't know about the salt, sugar and saturated fats content of their food that they consume daily. Of the participants, only 1% were able to answer all the 12 questions correctly while only 11% were able to answer four questions correctly.

Further, the survey suggested that some 63% people were unaware of the fact pepperoni pizza had more of the saturated fat than fish and chips. Health officials said that it was very necessary to know about their food contents, including the nastiest in them.

"Some of our favorite meals, takeaways and snacks contain high amounts of salt, sugar and saturated fat - it's our job to make sure to know where they are hiding", said Ainsley Marriott, the ambassador for Change4Life campaign.


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