Evolution from Tree Climbing to Walking Revealed

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Evolution from Tree Climbing to Walking Revealed

A recent study has found more evidence about Australopithecus afarensis, a prehistoric primate species, which is generally termed as Lucy.

Study author Dartmouth Nathaniel Dominy, who is an associate professor of anthropology with team, carried out a research on the species. The study researchers have unveiled that the specie used to live on trees as well.

Until Lucy was introduced to researchers, it was thought that Australopithecus afarensis remains largely on tress. They have assessed the information about the species and have found that the species used to possess a non-grasping foot.

"These traits are widely interpreted as being functionally incompatible with climbing and thus definitive markers of terrestriality", said the team. Further research was done and it was found that modern humans though have got their feet adapted to terrestrial bipedalism, their feet can still act as effective tree climbers.

In order to strengthen their study findings, the study researchers assessed modern humans in Africa as well as in Philippines. After assessing them, the study researchers concluded that they can effectively climb trees.

This has made the study researchers to conclude that Lucy was not only capable of climbing on trees, but could also walk. This transition holds great importance in human evolution.


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