SSRIs Taken During Pregnancy Not Linked with Infant Mortality

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SSRIs Taken During Pregnancy Not Linked with Infant Mortality

Concerns were raised that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increases infant mortality. Recent research has cancelled the claims by saying that SSRIs do not pose any sort of risk.

The study was taken out by a group of researchers from the Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm. Researchers affirmed that they did not find any link between SSRI taken during pregnancy and risk of stillbirth and post neo natal mortality.

Lead researcher Olof Stephansson said depression can take place during pregnancy. It is a big step of couple's life and especially crucial one for women. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, has found that the study researchers carried out the study on women who delivered single births.

Women, who were taken into account, were the ones who gave birth between 1996 and 2007 in the Nordic countries that include Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland. In total, 30,000 women were studied, who had filled a prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) while they were expecting.

"Decisions regarding use of SSRIs during pregnancy must take into account other perinatal outcomes and the risks associated with maternal mental illness", said the study author.


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