Gene Variant Found Responsible for Longevity

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Gene Variant Found Responsible for Longevity

As per a recent research taken out by UC Irvine and the Brookhaven National Laboratory, it has been revealed that derivative of dopamine gene receptor known as DRD4 7R allele seems to be involved with the longer life of a person.

The variant of the gene, which is commonly associated with active living among humans, has also been said to be involved in a longer life. Study researchers said the gene variant has been found in increased amount among those, who live an active and fun filled life in elderly hood.

Researcher Robert Moyzis from UC Irvine and Dr. Nora Volkow, who is a psychiatrist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, said that the gene variant plays a crucial role in the brain network working. The study, which has been published in the Journal of Neuroscience, has revealed the gene variant is responsible for encouraging social life filled with physical activities.

“It's been well documented that the more you're involved with social and physical activities, the more likely you'll live longer. It could be as simple as that”, said Moyzis. In order to reach at the above given result, the study researchers assessed genetic samples of 310 participants from more than 90 studies.


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