No harmful Chemicals in Sunscreens: Experts


No harmful Chemicals in Sunscreens: Experts

Chemicals are always considered harmful for skin and are recommended to be kept away from the reach of children. But, researchers from the University of Canberra have been suggesting that the chemicals present in sunscreens are nothing to fear.

Dr. Greg Kyle, the head of pharmacy, says that in that case, the more the chemicals present, the better it is. He affirms that these products are even better than the natural remedies. Since, these absorb ultraviolet light before the same could go through the skin.

Dr. Kyle said, "People can be scared about a long list of chemicals on a label, but remember, the products are regulated and tested, and even the natural products still contain chemicals".

However, sunburn could be better treated with cold tea and vinegar-like home remedies as these are in no way less than over-the-counter remedies.

It is being said that even slathering over sun-prone cheeks and noses is a good remedy. Still, people should at the same time remember to wear clothing and rash vests and a hat so that they could be safe from excessive exposure to sun. Also, if possible, one should avoid going out between 11am and 3pm.

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