Antioxidants May Cause Cancer

.

Antioxidants May Cause Cancer

A team of researchers from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York has published its recent report in the journal Open Biology, which has been claiming that supplements or anti-cancer superfoods often do not end up benefitting one, but rather these are likely to cause cancer.

Scientist James Watson had earlier been a great help in the discovery of the DNA structure. Now, he affirms that unless and until researchers pay attention to the role of antioxidants such as blueberries and broccoli or vitamin pills, the cancer cure would be left indefinable.

It is being said by him that likely these antioxidants might not have prevented cancers to such extent as much as these have probably caused.

These are believed to be preventing and treating cancer as well as boosting health by cleaning free radicals i. e. oxygen molecules. These actually may be depleting the body of them, thus proving counter-productive.

Free radicals, as per the findings, keep diseased cells under control. Also, these are majorly used in cancer drugs like radiotherapy.

"Hint that much of late-stage cancer's untreatability arises from its possession of too many antioxidants, the time is to seriously ask whether antioxidant use much more likely causes than prevents cancer", Dr. Watson said.


Latest News

Heart transplanted from dead patients to living patients conducted successfully
Menino halts cancer treatment, seeks palliative care
Uber offers flu shots requested by a single tap on mobile
Deafened mice hear after treatment, makes people hopeful
Shares of Coca-Cola Drop as Sales Remain Sluggish
Target Makes an Effort to Win Over Shoppers with Free Shipping
Agreement between Amazon.com and Simon & Schuster to be Advantageous for Both th
Nadella gets a Pay Package Worth $84M from Microsoft; Announces Help in Ebola Re
Slowest Growth in China since the 2008/9 Global Crisis
New Models of iPhone Helps Apple to Achieve a Record Profit
Reheating pasta makes it healthier
Google Glass’ first addict