Facebook Tries Novel Method to Filter Spam

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Facebook Tries Novel Method to Filter Spam

It has happened from last month only that Facebook has started charging $1 fee from people, who want to send a message to others, whom they do not know. Otherwise, Facebook used to provide poking and messaging service free of cost.

While talking about the change that Facebook has made, Facebook officials said that charging money from the sender is considered to be the best way to discourage him from sending unwanted messages to other people.

For now, the scheme is on trial run and a number of subscribers have been using the same. Facebook said that they have been testing the extreme price points as a way to know what works best in reducing spam. "Several commentators and researchers have noted that imposing a financial cost on the sender may be the most effective way to discourage unwanted messages", said Facebook.

There are some experts, who are not finding the idea to be a genuine one. They are of the theory that Facebook is actually testing a novel way to make more money. But, Facebook remains firm at its point that it has been doing the same to find an effective way to reduce the level of spam in one's Facebook account.


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