DARPA Aims to Develop Electronics That Kill Themselves after Use

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DARPA Aims to Develop Electronics That Kill Themselves after Use

As per the revelations of a new report, DARPA is on for a new project, which is being focused on improvement of transient electronics to be used on the battlefield.

The program has been designed observing the increased use of electronics on the battleground. It has been told that the improvements are not being looked for on the grounds of bringing more durability or making the electronics last longer.

But, the improvements are being planned in terms of making electronics last only until these are required. The electronics should be such that they dissolve into the environment when they receive command, said DARPA. Since, each and every device cannot be tracked or recovered individually.

The program newly designed has been dubbed the `Vanishing Programmable Resources' or the VAPR program. The same is aimed at ending the trend of electronic devices left scattered on the battlefield once their operation is over.

It is being said that scattering of devices also give enemies a chance to capture these, thereby repurposing these and compromise the US military's advantage.

"The breakdown of such devices could be triggered by a signal sent from command or any number of possible environmental conditions, such as temperature", Alicia Jackson, program manager for DARPA, exclaimed.


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