Teen Pregnancy Rates Become Stable in Canada

.

Teen Pregnancy Rates Become Stable in Canada

The Sex Information and Education Council of Canada had recently carried out a survey, which has shed light over a fact that the rate of teen pregnancies in the nation has started to level off long following a major decline was noted in the same.

The study had appeared in the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality on Tuesday, which had looked at the teen pregnancy rate for the period 2006-2010. The same unveiled that the rate was relatively stable in these years amongst women of ages 15 to 19 years.

The long-term decreasing trend had simply stopped and a level off was realized. The rates if not decreased any more, these did not increase either. The teen pregnancy rate was noted at 27.9 pregnancies per 100,000 women in the year 2006, which became 30.6 per 100,000 in 2007, followed by 30.5 8 in 2008 and 29.9 in 2009. In 2010, the same had reached 28.2.

However, a rise in teen pregnancies was noted in four provinces, including Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Manitoba, by above 15%.

"Teenage girls who feel optimistic about their career and educational opportunities tend to be less likely to become pregnant, versus girls who are feeling discouraged about their economic future", affirmed research co-ordinator Alexander McKay.


Latest News

Buffett Says Job-Cutting by 3G is a ‘Part of Capitalism’ and Efficient Business
Sea World Advertisement Says Killer Whales Live as Long in Captivity as in the W
Republican Senator, Ted Cruz to Compete for President’s Post; But Could his Birt
Ruth Porat to be Google’s New CFO
Fresh Competition Force Netflix, Hulu and Amazon to Look for New Technologies an
Cash-strapped Americans turn to Tax Refund Advances
Drone Manufacturers Have an Eye on North Dakota, Testing Ground for Unmanned Air
Tiffany’s Sales Decline due to a Strong Dollar
Bank of New York Mellon will settle Charges of Defrauding Customers for $714
Return Policy for Target’s Owned and Exclusive Brands Extended to One Year
Starbucks “Race Together” Idea Initiated by CEO Gets a Mixed Reaction
Brent Callinicos Uber’s CFO Steps Down to Spend More Time with Family