RIM Expects Blackberry 10 To Change Its Fortune

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RIM Expects Blackberry 10 To Change Its Fortune

Markets are abuzz with Blackberry 10 mobile operating system (OS) being unveiled today. It has been claimed that makers have lingered their hopes on the new offering. It has been further said that Research In Motion is leaving n stone unturned to make the launch a hit in Manhattan.

There will be a lot more shown besides the much awaited Blackberry 10, as per media reports. With competition tightening up, it is expected that the makers would have to do a lot to regain their lost grip in the market, which as of now is flooded with many smartphones.

However, mood seems to be a lot different among Wall Street analysts as Jan Dawson, chief telecoms analyst at Ovum indicates that though launch of [Blackberry 10] might spike the sales, there are not high expectations that it will last long.

"Though the new platform should have significant appeal to existing users, we don't expect it to win significant numbers of converts from other platforms", he said, while indicating that there is not much the company can do to enjoy its previous glory days.

It would be worth seeing how things fair up for the company, which as of now is facing a tough time in the market.


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