Researchers Raise Hope on 3D Printing


Researchers Raise Hope on 3D Printing

A recent research has shed light on how a 3D technique would be able to fasten up the development of artificial organs. It has been apparently claimed that Embryonic stem cells, being the "body's building blocks", have the tendency to transform into any type of tissue or organ in the body.

It has been further explained by researchers led by Dr. Will Shu at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh that the cells, which are produced from early stage embryos, are raw and perhaps that's what makes them strong enough to mold in any type of tissue in the body.

Further explaining about the technology, he said it was "accurate enough to produce spheroids of uniform size and, most importantly, the printed human embryo stem cells maintained their pluripotency - the ability to differentiate into any other cell type".

There are high chances that the technology will be used to develop tissues for drug testing, for which animals are being used now. Talking about the same, Jason King, of the stem cell biotech company Roslin Cellab, who was part of the research, said that usually, in labs, 2D cells are grown but there are few made in 3D. But, this is perhaps the first time that human stem cell cultures have been played on like this.

As per the team, there are chances that this technology would be able to build a `production line' of artificial organs in next 10 years to come.

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