Researchers Link Cannabis Use to Stroke

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Researchers Link Cannabis Use to Stroke

A study conducted newly by a group of researchers at Auckland University has claimed that cannabis use may almost double a person's risk of facing a stroke. The findings have been recently presented at the International Stroke Conference of the American Stroke Association in Honolulu.

It is for the first time that the link between stroke and cannabis use has been discovered. As many as 150 stroke patients were enrolled for the study along with 10 other persons who had faced transient ischemic attack. Transient ischemic attack is a condition when blood does not flow for a small period to a part of the brain.

The team found 16% of all participants were positive for cannabis. Also, most of them were males, who also were addicted to tobacco use. It has been told that the patients, whether or not cannabis users, had no difference in stroke mechanism, age and many vascular risk factors.

It has been warned that people should think twice before making use of cannabis and related products. "Cannabis has been thought by the public to be a relatively safe, although illegal substance. This study shows this might not be the case - it may lead to stroke", said Professor Alan Barber.


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