Risks of Respiratory Conditions Vary with Geographic Conditions

.

Risks of Respiratory Conditions Vary with Geographic Conditions

A study, which has recently appeared in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, has claimed that geographic factors might have a major role to play when it comes to the development of diseases such as asthma and food allergy.

The Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study was carried out by researchers at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Recruiting some 5,729 participants, the review found that atopic people living nearby the equator were at higher risks of having asthma.

While risk of hay fever was 28% higher, the risk for suffering from food allergy was high by 38% and the perils of dust allergy were high by 41% as compared to non-atopic individuals. High exposure to UV-B was also linked to increased risk of the conditions.

Those who were non-atopic but lived closer to the equator were at lesser risk of the conditions. The risks of development of skin sensitization to HDM (house dust mites) were also reduced in these people. The study was population-based and focused at examining respiratory diseases that extend from childhood to adulthood.

"We found that latitude and UV-B exposure were associated with current asthma and that atopy modified those associations but asthma severity did not", said author Shyamali Dharmage.


Latest News

Heart transplanted from dead patients to living patients conducted successfully
Menino halts cancer treatment, seeks palliative care
Uber offers flu shots requested by a single tap on mobile
Deafened mice hear after treatment, makes people hopeful
Shares of Coca-Cola Drop as Sales Remain Sluggish
Target Makes an Effort to Win Over Shoppers with Free Shipping
Agreement between Amazon.com and Simon & Schuster to be Advantageous for Both th
Nadella gets a Pay Package Worth $84M from Microsoft; Announces Help in Ebola Re
Slowest Growth in China since the 2008/9 Global Crisis
New Models of iPhone Helps Apple to Achieve a Record Profit
Reheating pasta makes it healthier
Google Glass’ first addict