Hoodoos for Prediction of Earthquakes

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Hoodoos for Prediction of Earthquakes

As per the finding of a research, many scientists along with Rasool Anooshehpoor, from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission may provide an instrument to examine the accuracy of earthquake hazards.

Tall sedimentary rock spires called as hoodoos may have the potential of indicating earthquake maneuver in a particular area. These hoodoo formations are seen in desert regions, and are common in North America, the Middle East and northern Africa.

They are caused when different types of sedimentary rocks degrade and leave boulders or thin caps of hard rock on soft surface. After understanding the sedimentary rocks, determining the earthquake conditions of the area are possible.

Anooshehpoor said that the models used by United States Geological Survey (USGS) does not provide accurate picture for long-term. Present hazard maps use data that is very scant. They concentrate on the data of the last hundred years. It has been seen that the earthquakes have returned after thousands of years.

Dr Juan Carlos Afonso from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Sydney's Macquarie University said that rather than using instruments for prediction of earthquakes, anything natural like this will be beneficial.

The scientists have said that this is a novel work in seismic field and also requires strong proofs to rely on the accuracy.

 


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