Researchers Link Air Pollution with Low Birth Weight Babies

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Researchers Link Air Pollution with Low Birth Weight Babies

While there is nothing new that air pollution causes health concerns, it has been recently warned that it can make pregnant women give birth to lighter babies, all the more likely. The research, based on data over three million births in nine nations in North America, South America, Europe, Asia and Australia, is claimed to be one of the most researched out over the potential link between air pollution and fetal development.

It has been made clear that extensive is the air pollution, higher are the chances of babies born with reduced weight. It is to be noted that babies born with weight less than 5.5 pounds, or 2.5 kilograms are most likely to witness health complications later in life, as per Payam Dadvand of the Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL) in Barcelona, who lead the research.

"In the United States, we have shown over the last several decades that the benefits to health and well-being from reducing air pollution are far greater than the costs", said Woodruff, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology and reproductive sciences at UC San Francisco, who is part of the research.

It is believed that countries which impose firm pollution norms are most likely to have lower levels of the pollutants. It is however now being tested in some cases, if such exposures during pregnancy can have long term effects on children at later stage of their life.

 


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