Teenager Develops Pancreatic Cancer Test Tool

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Teenager Develops Pancreatic Cancer Test Tool

Jack Andraka, 16, has successfully built pancreatic cancer testing device that is far better than the traditional tools used for the purpose.

Andraka's pancreatic test is said to be 26,000 times cheaper than the traditional tests available and is 400 times more sensitive and 168 times faster in comparison to them. The test was found to be 100% accurate in its preliminary tests.

It is priced at mere $3 and is capable of discovering cancers earlier than all other methods. He discovered the test without really knowing what pancreas was. He was inspired for the same after a tragedy which affected him deeply.

One of his dear friends died of the pancreatic cancer and it was after that, Andraka began to explore the internet for collecting information about the disease. He learnt that cancer, most of the times, is diagnosed when it's not possible to save the sufferer.

Consequently, he surfed through the web and contacted top health officials for building up a device that can detect cancer at early stage. Finally, this was what he made; a $3 device that takes three minutes to discover the cancer, he affirmed at TED Talk 2013.

He was awarded the 2012 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair grand prize and Smithsonian magazine's first annual American Ingenuity Award for the breakthrough at young age.


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