Carbon Dioxide Not Singly to be blamed for Rising Temperatures: Report

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Carbon Dioxide Not Singly to be blamed for Rising Temperatures: Report

The recent reports from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) suggested the inverse relation between the rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the global temperatures.

The newly released data rejected the pre-existing assertions of global warming caused by the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The NOAA release suggested that the level of carbon dioxide rose from 2.67 parts per million in 2012 to 395 ppm at present. The appraisal is considered to be the second highest since the year 1959. The initialization of the measurements of the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere started in 1959.

The reports disclosed the fact that global temperatures are the same as they existed in 1995 with small amount of the carbon dioxide levels that were about 360 ppm. Though the level of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased to 10% between 1995 and 2012, the global temperature didn't face any rise.

The reports suggested that the findings are not the first of its kind as similar results were also discovered in the mid-1940s through the mid-1970s. Those years clearly depicted that the global temperatures saw a 30-year decline but the carbon dioxide levels rose nearly 10%.

The NOAA data also resulted in the futility of the assignment of costly carbon dioxide restrictions on the U. S. economy in the name of fighting global warming. The U. S. carbon dioxide emissions reduced to up to 10% during the past decade but the total world consumption remained higher.


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