Japan Earthquake Shakes Space too!

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Japan Earthquake Shakes Space too!

It seems to be the first of its kind report as it claims that the Tohoku earthquake realized two years back in Japan had left its impacts to be felt at the space edge as well.

Without a doubt, the earthquake that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, was massive with a magnitude of 9. It is being said that a sound wave was sent by the same, which has been caught by Goce satellite.

Published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the latest study was conducted by researchers from the European Space Agency (ESA). Dr. Rune Floberghagen told that the signal was looked for earlier as well with other satellites.

Since, it has been observed many times that major earthquakes produce infrasound, or very low-frequency acoustic waves. However, such signal could not be found probably because there was a need for an extremely fine instrument.

This time, it was a super-sensitive satellite, which successfully detected the disturbance when it passed through air's thin wisps. These were still present some 255km above the Earth.

"Goce's accelerometers are about a hundred times more sensitive than any previous instrumentation and we detected the acoustic wave twice - passing through it over the Pacific and over Europe", said the mission manager.


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