Australians Trapped in Drug Menace

.

Australians Trapped in Drug Menace

A survey conducted in partnership with Fairfax Media in November sated that a large number of invisible Australians are drinking in a large amount. This habit of excessive drinking is causing lot of harm to them and others as well.

The survey was conducted on 6,605 Australians. The results of the survey disclosed the fact that 85% of them had consumed a minimum of one illegal drug in their life time. Among these illegal drugs, the consumption of alcohol was at the top.

A large number of them were found to be drinking at a level that will cause threat. Out of the total, 37% were found to have medium level of alcoholic consumption.

All the subjects were mostly Fairfax readers. Out of the total subjects, 61% were male and more than half of them were tertiary qualified. Around 61% of them were males with earnings of more than $100,000 yearly.

Dr .Adam Winstock, the founder of Global Drug Survey and a psychiatrist, said a similar amount of alcoholic consumption was discovered in the survey as in the former studies and surveys. He said there is a misconception about a person being alcohol dependent. He explained that people believe that the people who do not wake up in the morning without shaking and sweating are alcohol dependent and if they are not they are safe.

He rejected the perceptions and stated that a person is not able to make out if his behavior is abnormal or not if he is living in a group of heavily drunken people.


Latest News

U.S. Economic Growth Gets a Boost with New Home Building
Tesla May not Get an Opportunity to Open Stores in Michigan
Cuban role applauded by Kerry in Ebola fight
Travel restrictions can be caused by rising polio cases
Unprotected sex increases in final year of college
Amid Ebola fears in US, newspaper chooses to focus on India's 'health crisis'
Report Given by Nuclear Regulatory says Closure Plan of Yucca Mountain Meets Saf
Google’s Slowing Clicks on Ads Worry Investors and Analysts
Video games can actually help
Aussie’s chest burrowed by Bali spider
No reduction in atrial fibrillation with fish oil, new research finds
Existing protocols might not be enough for Ebola