Blood Test for Examining Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients’ Response to Treatment Raises Hopes

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Blood Test for Examining Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients’ Response to Treatmen

Sources disclosed about the introduction of a new blood test to examine the response of breast cancer treatment for women. The new technique is termed as `liquid biopsy'.

AUS study that compared the various tests developed to monitor the size of metastatic breast cancer was published in the Telegraph. The study headed towards a new blood test developed for the detection of the portions of tumor DNA in the blood. It had a motive of assessing its ability to examine the response of the body of a breast cancer patient to chemotherapy.

Metastatic breast cancer is a type of cancer that got spread out of the breast tissue and had made its way into other parts of the body. The cancer has no cure at present but can be regulated by the treatment in an attempt to prolong survival of the sufferer.

As discovered by the study, the levels of the portions of tumor DNA in the blood of these women responded similar to the level of disease as shown by CT scans. They discovered that the results of this blood test were more accurate than the blood tests that were suggested by the other prevailing markers of cancer.

The response of this blood test is encouraging but there is still a necessity of applying the results on a larger group of women to see its impact. This might turn as a milestone in monitoring the response of the patients body to chemotherapy, stated the study.

 


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