Global Warming Could be on a Faster Rate than Expected

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Global Warming Could be on a Faster Rate than Expected

A recent study suggests that land covered with trees and shrubs may increase by 52% by 2050 on Arctic. Till now, climate scientists have been expecting this to happen by the end of 21st century.

This study observed the association between climate and vegetation changes. Researchers claim that these changes in climate won't only affect the vegetation but would make changes in the wildlife and the living beings that depend on wildlife for their food.

Global warming in this region has taken place on double the rate in comparison to the warming level all over the world. Studies have also been suggesting that there is a four time rise in the temperature during winters in comparison to the summers. Thus, the areas that were once covered by tundra are now being replaced with trees and upright shrubs.

Studies conducted in the past had also claimed that more green the Arctic, more would be the levels of warming. Although, greener areas would help in the cooling of soils after the snow melts, yet it would also warm up the air earlier in the season of spring and would then slow the rate of cold temperatures during fall.

This latest study based on the changes in vegetation has been conducted by a team of researchers under the leadership of Richard Pearson from the American Museum of Natural History in New York.


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