Mysterious Stone Pile Found in Sea of Galilee

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Mysterious Stone Pile Found in Sea of Galilee

As per recent reports, it has been revealed that a group of archaeologists has found a stone structure in Sea of Galilee.

One of the researchers from Ben-Gurion University explained the structure of the ancient monumental stone. He said the mysterious rock is in the shape of cone and weight around 54,400 tonnes.

The revelation of the same has also been published in the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology. The researchers said the rock pile is 10 metres in height and 70 metres in diameter.

Though a lot has been revealed about stone, rock's age and its usage is still a mystery. "The shape and composition of the submerged structure does not resemble any natural feature. We therefore conclude that it is a man-made and might be termed a cairn", said researchers.

The purpose of the stone is yet to be known, but the researchers have been speculating its uses. They were of the view that the stone might be acting as a way to attract fishes.

Another speculated reason provided by researchers was that the rock might have been present dry land, but with passage of it has got covered by increasing sea levels. Further research is needed to know more about the same.


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