Stephen Hawking Hopes to Fly to Space with Virgin Galactic

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Stephen Hawking Hopes to Fly to Space with Virgin Galactic

Stephen Hawking has been fighting against neurogenerative disease for many years but is still passionate when it comes to travelling.

Yes! It was affirmed by him on Tuesday in a charity talk that travel of any kind was what he still hoped. The report finds that the brilliant theoretical physicist has spent years of his life studying cosmos mysteries.

And now, at the age of 71, he wishes and in fact bets on reaching at them himself. He said though he was on ventilator, his lifestyle was not restricted by the same. Familiar computer-generated voice was used to say it.

As per the report, Hawking had experienced eight rounds of weightlessness six years back on a specially modified Boeing 727 jet. His training for a viable flight in space had then begun. Hawking said that the zero-G part was amazing and the high-G part as well.

Prior to the trip, Richard Branson, Virgin Galactic founder, had said it would be their honour to see Stephen fly with them. A medical team was there and chief medical officer was planned to sit down with Stephen. However, it was Stephen's call at the end.

"I have been to Brussels, the Isle of Man, Geneva, Canada, California and hope to visit space with Virgin Galactic. It's possible to have quality of life on a ventilator", Hawking said.


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