Pfizer Decides to Sell Viagra on Its Website

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Pfizer Decides to Sell Viagra on Its Website

Pfizer has introduced a new option for those who feel shy when it comes to help in the bedroom, a new report has uncovered.

Men, who are bashful while asking for Viagra at a drugstore, would now be able to avail the same online. Pfizer Inc. has announced that it has planned to put the little blue pill on sales on its website.

The pill is meant for popular erectile dysfunction. Though, men could buy the diamond-shaped drug at the site, they would still need to get prescription for the same, the company said.

It was added that men who were troubled by the steep price of $25-a-pill of Viagra, could also take a sigh of relaxation. They could now get three free pills along with the first order. Also, 30% off the second one would be offered by the firm.

It is being said that the bold move taken by the company has blown up the distribution model of the drug industry. Since, medicines are not sold by drugmakers directly to patients. However, it was necessary because the problem of shying of men plagued the industry.

Health care strategist, Les Funtleyder, from private equity fund Poliwogg, said, "If it works, everybody will hop on the train".


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