Queensland Develops Influenza Screening Test for Humans

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Queensland Develops Influenza Screening Test for Humans

It seems the Queensland Government is aware of the potential risk of the mutation of the novel avian influenza H7N9. Therefore, it has rolled up its sleeves and has come up with a test, which can detect influenza among humans.

The test, said to be the first in Australia, has been developed by scientists working with Microbiology Department and the Queensland Paediatric Infectious Disease Laboratory.

Revealing about the test, experts affirmed the test requires taking a wash up from the throat of people, who are said to be having influenza. The swab will then be sent to Pathology Queensland Central Laboratory, which is at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) campus.

The sample there will be tested at a genetic level. Lawrence Springborg, Queensland Minister for Health, was of the view that the test is considered to be maiden for Australia. His ministers have affirmed that no similar test is present for influenza screening across the nation.

"The fact this test has been developed right here in Queensland is a testament to the quality work of our microbiologists and lab technicians, and I applaud their initiative", said Springborg.

Professor Graeme Nimmo, Director of Microbiology at Pathology Queensland said the test was vital in keeping Australia safe from influenza.


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