Report from UN’s FAO Raises Profile of Insects as Sources of Food and Feed

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Report from UN’s FAO Raises Profile of Insects as Sources of Food and Feed

A recent report by the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has recommended the insects as the source of food and feed as the experts have said that increase in world population will raise the need for more food.

It emerged that the world population will increase largely in the coming decades and is expected to hit a mark of 9 billion by 2050. The report by the organization avows that there is need to reassess what we eat and how we produce to meet the food and nutrition challenges.

It also suggested that at present, there are about one billion chronically hungry people on the planet. It emerged that in such scenario, insects can be seen as a feasible option to satisfy the rising food demand of the world.

Many insects including beetles, caterpillars, wasps, ants, grasshoppers, crickets, cicadas, termites and dragonflies are thought to be edible as well as nutritive. Also, they are available in a large number of amounts in the nature.

"Alternative solutions to conventional livestock and feed sources urgently need to be found. The consumption of insects, or entomophagy, therefore contributes positively to the environment and to health and livelihoods", averred the report by FAO. A large number of people are already reported to eat insects in their diet.


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