Plain-Packaging Makes Cigarettes Less Appealing: Study

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Plain-Packaging Makes Cigarettes Less Appealing: Study

Published in the online British Medical Journal, a new study has found that plain-packaging helps in making the cigarettes less appealing to smokers.

The study asserts that plain packaging had major effect on the smoking habit of the smokers. It was found that it made the cigarettes appear to be of poorer quality and less satisfying to the smokers. This led to increase in desire to quit in them.

Plain packaging was introduced in December last year and it is the first major study after that. It is said that the findings of the study may prompt David Cameron, the Prime Minister of Britain, to think second time over his stance on introduction of the move in Britain.

The research was funded by Quit Victoria and surveyed over 536 smokers in November 2012. Of the smokers surveyed, 73% smoked from plain pack while the rest of 27% smoked from branded packs. It was found that most of the smokers from plain pack thought their cigarettes to be of poorer quality and less satisfying.

"The findings fit with all the anecdotal information we are getting - plain packaging provides smokers with that extra incentive to quit", said Professor Mike Daube, President of Australian Council on Smoking and Health.


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