Kids Watching Excessive TV have Poor Motor Skills

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Kids Watching Excessive TV have Poor Motor Skills

If your kid has been watching television more than recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, you may need to worry about it.  A recent research conducted at the University of Montreal has suggested that watching television an extra hour than suggested may weaken a kid's vocabulary, classroom attention as well as mathematical skills.

According to the study authors, a kid is likely to be bullied by the classmates if watches television more than recommended every day.

"These kids are watching too much television at a time when they should be out there in the environment exploring and interacting, especially with other humans", said Professor Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal.  She added that due to more exposure to TV, kids play less, therefore, don't develop social and motor skills.

As per the recommendations given by AAP, kids after age of two should not watch television more than two hours every day.  Whereas, infants till the age of two should not watch television at all.

The study is based on a survey conducted on 1,006 boys and 991 girls.  Till now, most of the studies have surveyed kids who are already in school to examine their vocabulary and mathematical skills.  The recent surveyed kids before they entered the schools.


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