Google releases ‘Coder’ tool to enable Raspberry Pi users to build web programs

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Google releases ‘Coder’ tool to enable Raspberry Pi users to build web programs

In a move which will essentially enable the users of the versatile and low-priced Raspberry Pi mini-computers to build and test web programs, Google has recently launched a free open source tool dubbed ‘Coder.’

The Coder tool – for facilitating the use of Raspberry Pi mini-computers for building programs for the web – is the brainchild of Google Creative Lab 'creative technologist' Jason Striegel, designer Jeff Baxter, and a small team of employees in New York.

Coder chiefly converts the cheap, $35-priced mini-computers into personal web servers via a stripped-back web-based development environment. Raspberry Pi users can download the tool from the web to a Mac or PC. While a Mac OS X installer is included in the Coder package, PC users will have to download separate utilities. In addition, users will also require a 4GB SD card for transferring the Coder SD image to the Raspberry Pi.

According to the details shared by Google, Coder offers a simple platform which can be used by teachers, parents, and others, for demonstrating how programs can be built for the web through browser-based projects written in HTML, CSS and Javascript.

Coder contains a password-controlled sign-in; and it is capable of running a standard wired Ethernet connection. However, for running the Coder tool on a Wi-Fi connection, Raspberry Pi users will require a $12-priced mini Wi-Fi module.


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