Collision of Comet with Meteor could spawn Life

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Collision of Comet with Meteor could spawn Life

As per the latest study, it has been revealed that building blocks of life will be produced after collision of icy comets with planets. These small pieces of life can also be called ad amino acids, which is produced when a heavily meteorite is hit by an ice-covered comet.

Comets are made up of a mixture of ammonia, carbon dioxide and methanol. Methanol is basically a type of Alcohol.

Amino acids are produced by intense heat and pressure caused when comet hits a planet, said the team of Imperial College London, the University of Kent and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Scientists have discovered two best conditions that produce amino acids, when meteor hit the comet. One is Ice present on the surface of Enceladus and Europe and the other is the Moon orbiting the Saturn and the Jupiter.

Researchers said, "Suggest a pathway for the synthetic production of the components of proteins within our solar system, and thus a potential pathway towards life through icy impacts".

Zita Martin, Doctor at Imperial College London, said that comets and meteorites had hit the Earth at about 3.8 to 4.5 billion years ago. This resulted in the existence of life on Earth from about 3.5 billion years ago.

 


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