Small Mammals in Forest Fragment are on the Verge of Extinction

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Small Mammals in Forest Fragment are on the Verge of Extinction

According to new research by the scientists, some species of the rainforest fragments could disappear.

An international team of scientists along with the scientists from the University of Adelaide said that the creatures in the forest fragments have disappeared at a rapid pace compared to the previous year.

According to the study led by the scientists two decades ago, they concluded that the small mammals are on the verge of extinction on the forest islands, which are created by big hydroelectric reservoirs in Thailand.

Professor Corey Bradshaw, Director Ecological Modeling at the University of Adelaide's Environment Institute, said: "Tropical forests remain one of the last great bastions of biodiversity, but they continue to be felled and fragmented into small 'islands' around the world".

The researchers believed that there is a need to take more steps in controlling our tropical forests, which led to the improvement in the conservation of wildlife as well as aquatic life.

Prof. Bradshaw warned people about the total loss of the small mammals and requested them to conserve the natural ecological balance of the atmosphere.

Luke Gibson, scientist at the National University of Singapore, said that this extinction of species is like an ecological Armageddon. He also led a study "Nobody imagined we'd see such catastrophic local extinctions".


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