Poison-Resistant Rodents hit Edinburg

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Poison-Resistant Rodents hit Edinburg

Experts have warned that `mutant super rats' have developed resistance to poison used to kill them. Rats are enjoying poison as if it is just food for them. Pest controllers have reported the woes of Edinburg residents who are baffled over the fact that despite giving poison to rats, they have not been able to get rid of them.

The most likely reason behind this is that the vermin has become more resistant to toxins. Researchers have found that the numbers of `super rats' are growing. They have been studying the DNA of pest controllers' victims to figure out ways to resolve the issue.

It was revealed by a team from Huddersfield University that rodents have become poison-resistant and are able to consume anticoagulant pellets like feed.

Richard Moseley, of the British Pest Control Association, said, "Normal rats are being killed off by poison, so these resistant species are taking their place - it's only natural that their numbers are expanding. They eat poison like feed - you might as well be leaving out grain for them".

He suggested people to go for professional advice as rats are known to carry and spread diseases. It is very important to keep a check on their population because they pose a serious threat on public health.


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