Couples Sharing Similar Taste for Alcohol have Lower Divorce Rate: Study


Couples Sharing Similar Taste for Alcohol have Lower Divorce Rate: Study

A research has been carried out by a group of researchers from the University at Buffalo Research Institute. As per the research, it has been unveiled that couples who share similar tastes for alcohol remain together overtime.

In order to reach at the above given result, the researchers have tracked nearly 650 US couples from the time of their weddings to their first nine years of marriage.

After assessing the couples, the researchers have reached at a conclusion that the divorce rates of around 50% couples were of those in which one partner was a heavy drinker. On the other hand, those couples who shared same taste for alcohol has 30% divorce rate.

Lead researcher Kenneth Leonard said, "Our results indicate that it is the difference between the couple's drinking habits, rather than the drinking itself, that leads to marital dissatisfaction, separation and divorce".

The study has been published in the Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. In the study, researchers have termed heavy drinking as the activity in which six and more drinks are consumed at one time.

The researchers were shocked to know that divorce rate for heavy drinkers were not higher in comparison to the couple, who were non-drinkers.

Latest News

Sources Say ABInBev will Possibly Raise SABMiller Bid to Around 43 to 44 Pounds
William Lewis
Weaker Dollar and Lower U.S Rig Count Help Oil Edge Up
Gold Gains as Investors do not See any Chance of US Rate Hike Immediately
Contract Fees is the Key Reason for Tegna and Dish Spat
A Rise in the Medicare Premiums Could Mean Huge Increase for some and Opportunit
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development
New Twitter CEO Expected to Cut Costs and Bring Changes
Deutsche Bank Q3 Loss may be a Record One in a Decade
Volkswagen Scandal Worries the City of Wolfsburg
Strong Component Sale and Weak Won help Samsung’s Third Quarter Profits
Is the U.S. Shale Oil Boom Heading Towards the Beginning of Its End?