Serious Concussion could Lead to Alzheimer's Risk

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Serious Concussion could Lead to Alzheimer's Risk

If findings of a new study are to be believed, a serious concussion could lead to boost the risk of developing Alzheimer's decades later. However, it does not implicate for everyone with head trauma to lose memory, but some would have increased chances of having the same.

The study was conducted by a team from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The study saw examination of brain scans of 448 older Minnesotans who had no issues of memory loss and 141 who had.

Researchers said approximately 17% of people in both the groups had brain injury earlier in life, which caused some loss of consciousness or memory.

It was found that brain scans were normal for those with no signs of memory problems but history of brain injury. However, those with memory problems and a history of brain injury were the ones who had five times higher risk of developing Alzheimer's. It was because they were more likely to show a buildup of brain protein connected with Alzheimer's.

Jo Rushworth, who led the study by a team in the Faculty of Biological Sciences, said, "If we were able to diagnose Alzheimer's disease earlier, the symptoms could be better managed and future treatments could be given at a time when they would have most effect".


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