Stem Cells Are Able to Cure Deadly Skin Disease: Research

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Stem Cells Are Able to Cure Deadly Skin Disease: Research

According to a latest research, now people who are prone to develop skin blisters or have chances of developing skin tumors genetically, can solve their problem with the help of a new stem cell-based gene therapy.

It has been revealed by the experts that till date there was no treatment available for people who suffered from genetic skin disorder known as epidermolysis bullosa (EB).

But the researchers have recently claimed that there might be an answer to such people's problem with the help of new gene therapy.

The researchers at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy have recently discovered that if stem cells are transplanted into a patient's legs then they will be able to restore normal skin functions.

This conclusion has been derived by these researchers after the evaluation of a patient, who was suffering from EB and who underwent a gene therapy treatment.

It is also believed by the researchers that, with the help of this type of gene therapy a patient will be able to recover from his/her skin disorders without any side effects.

Michele De Luca, senior study author, said, "These findings pave the way for the future safe use of epidermal stem cells for combined cell and gene therapy of epidermolysis bullosa and other genetic skin diseases".


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