Sea Level Expected to Rise by about Two Feet by 2050 in Los Angeles

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Sea Level Expected to Rise by about Two Feet by 2050 in Los Angeles

Research team from USC expects low-lying areas in Los Angeles to have high risk in coming years due to increase in sea level by about two feet by 2050.  Global warming and climate change are the two factors that are held responsible for this cause.

Global warming has been an issue of concern from past many years across the globe.  A team of researchers from USC in collaboration with the city of Los Angeles have united together to measure the effect of rising tides on local communities and infrastructure.

They revealed that by doing proper planning and early identification of adaptation measures, we can protect assets that are at higher risk of sea level rise.  Phyllis Grifman, associate Director of the USC Sea Grant Program, said: "Some low-lying areas within the city's jurisdiction, such as Venice Beach and some areas of Wilmington and San Pedro are already vulnerable to flooding".

He added that early identification of areas at high risk of floods, storms and high tides is the key element in beginning of effective planning for future.  Some other factors have also been stated by the researchers that are city's wastewater management, storm water management and potable water systems.

These factors have been declared as the ones that are more vulnerable to increase in sea level.  It has been reported that the Port of Los Angeles and the city's energy infrastructure would be mostly unaffected areas by the rise in sea level.


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