New climate strategy: track the world's wealthiest

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New climate strategy: track the world's wealthiest

As the G8 leaders are going to meet in L'Aquila, Italy on July 9 to discuss emissions reduction, a new study holds the rich responsible for the climate change.

Physicist Shoibal Chakravarty, a lead author of the report and a research scholar at the Princeton Environmental Institute, said, "We estimate that in 2008, half of the world's emissions came from just 700 million people."

According to the new study most of the global emissions come from the rich irrespective of their nationality. So the study suggests that a country which is copious in high-emitting people must do more to reduce carbon emissions.

Rich countries like the U.S have said this gives developing countries an unfair economic advantage.

Countries like India and China argue that their contribution to greenhouse gases is very low as compared with developed countries. Hence they should be exempt from rigorous emission cuts levels.

It may be noted here that presently the world average for a single being annual carbon emissions is about 5 tons; for a European 10 tons and for an American 20 tons.

On the other hand, critics of this approach claim that with out a global approach the climate crisis can not be fought back.


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