FDA now introducing big anti-tobacco campaign for the youth

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FDA now introducing big anti-tobacco campaign for the youth

An important anti-tobacco campaign will be started in the United States one week from now pointed at the most vulnerable group which is the young people, who face the greatest danger of getting dependent on cigarettes.

As per a statement by the FDA the $115 million fight by the Food and Drug Administration will focus on the 10 million individuals matured
12 to 17 who are interested in smoking cigarettes or who are now exploring different avenues regarding them and are in peril of converting into habitual smokers.

Among a group of several anti-tobacco campaign to be launched in the coming two years this one is the first. Others will be targeting people from the country, gay, African American, and American Indian youth.

The FDA said that their aim is to decrease the amount of youth cigarette smokers by no less than 300,000 inside three years. Mitch Zeller, leader of the FDA's tobacco items division, said at a media instructions on Monday that the initially, called 'The Real Cost' fight, will start on February 11 and targets minimized youths who may be beginning to turn to tobacco as a method for adapting to poor or distressing lives.


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