Environmental Protection Agency will Build a Temporary Treatment Plant for Gold King Mine

Environmental Protection Agency will Build a Temporary Treatment Plant for Gold

In a document released last week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said that it was considering putting up a plant for the wastewater that is flowing from the Gold King Mine. It was accidentally unplugged in August during an examination and polluted rivers flowing through three states.

On Wednesday, the EPA said that it will be setting up a temporary treatment plant for the wastewater flowing from the Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado.
Two U.S senators of Colorado insist that the agency built a plant that would operate for a longer-term for treating the acidic water that's flowing from mines located in Upper Animas River watershed all around Silverton. They said that the pollution from the shafts which are not operational poses a serious problem all across the West.

According to the EPA, the temporary plant for the Gold King Mine is required as it will not be safe to operate the settling ponds which are at present in use, but soon will be frozen when the winter temperatures drops lower than zero.

The facility is expected to cost approximately $1.8 million and will hopefully start operating by October 14. It will run for up to forty two weeks. According to the EPA, to operate, it will cost $20,000 per week. Without giving many details, Christie St. Clair, an EPA spokeswoman said the plant would be portable.
 

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