Tiversa CEO: High-profile ‘confidential’ information “exploding” via P2P networks!

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Tiversa

During a Wednesday hearing before the US House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, officials from the file sharing security specialist, Tiversa, testified the continuing risk associated with the peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs.

The hearing was organized with the aim of reviewing the risks that 'leakages' on P2P networks can lead to, in terms of national security, consumer identity theft and corporate data. The question about the unrelenting vulnerabilities of P2P networks arose yet again after a recent high-profile breach pertaining to a US Secret Service document.

Speaking at hearing, Robert Boback, CEO of Tiversa, showed the committee all the recently-leaked 'confidential' information that the P2P monitoring vendor found on the Internet. The information breached via file-to-file sharing included the security details for the First Lady, private medical information of thousands of patients, and classified information on military personnel.

Noting that 'confidential' information is "exploding" on the Internet, Boback said that another recently-breached document explicitly details the location of every nuclear facility in the US. The 'highly confidential' document is dated July 5, 2009, and bears President Obama's signature on its cover page.

Saying that the mentioned 'confidential' documents were found during the last few months, and most of them can still be found on P2P networks, Boback added: "Clearly there is a problem. A number of government agencies are exposing information."


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