Extreme happiness can also cause heart-weakening, study

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Extreme happiness can also cause heart-weakening, study

According to a new research study, the feeling of extreme happiness can also cause heart-weakening syndrome for people.

 

Experts said that a rare condition known as "broken heart" or Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) is normally caused by intense grief and causes the hear tot become weak. The condition is named after a Japanese octopus trap that resembles the bulbous shape of the left ventricle of a heart affected by TTS. Experts said that the condition can increase the risk of heart attack for the person.

 

The British Heart Foundation has said that the condition is generally reversible and temporary. They said that the TTS is caused by links between a psychologically taxing events and the cardiovascular system. The new study showed that the happy events can have a similar impact on the person and have named the condition, "happy heart syndrome."

 

The team of researchers in Switzerland studied data from 1,750 patients diagnosed with TTS across nine different countries. They found that 20 per cent were diagnosed with the TTS after happy occasions such as a birthday party, wedding, a surprise party, the birth of a close relative, or their favourite sports team winning a game.

 

Dr JelenaGhadri, from University Hospital Zurich in Switzerland, said, "A TTS patient is no longer the classic 'broken hearted' patient, and the disease can be preceded by positive emotions too."


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