STI risk linked to pubic hair grooming

STI risk linked to pubic hair grooming

Sexually active people who regularly groom their pubic hair are more likely to contract sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than those who do not groom their pubic hair at all, a new study warned.

Dr. E. Charles Osterberg, of University of Texas, and colleagues asked more than 7,500 people ages 18 to 65 how often they removed or trimmed their pubic hair and what kind of tools they used. They also asked them how many sexual partners they'd had in their lives, and whether they had ever contracted an STI.

At total of 7,470 of the participants reported having at least one sexual partner, and 943 participants (13 per cent) reported having at least one of the following diseases -- herpes, human papillomavirus, pubic lice, chlamydia, syphilis, molluscum, gonorrhea or HIV.

The researchers concluded that those who regularly groomed their pubic hair were nearly 80 per cent more likely to contract an STI than those who never groomed their pubic hair.

Sharing the findings of the study, Osterberg said, "Modern society has dictated our perception of genital normalcy, and what it means to feel attractive or feminine or masculine has changed. This study sheds some light on a potential complication associated with the increasingly common practice of grooming."

The study cautioning people against the increasingly common practice of grooming appeared in the Dec. 5th edition of the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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