South Korean manufacturer iRiver launching its ‘Story’ e-reader in UK

.

iRiver

The e-book reader market bigwigs, Amazon and Sony, have more competition coming their way - with the well-known South Korean MP3 player maker, iRiver, launching its 'Story' e-reader in the UK.

Saying that the 'Story' is essentially "stepping up to challenge Sony's Reader and Amazon's new Kindle," iRiver elaborated that its forthcoming e-reader features a QWERTY keyboard which will enable users to edit documents as well as interact with an on-board diary and scheduler.

The fairly unembellished 'Story' has a 6-inch 800 x 600 e-ink screen and will be available in a slightly off-white matte color. Boasting 7000 page turns from a single charge of its battery, the 'Story' is compatible with epub, pdf and txt formats. In addition, it also displays office files like doc, ppt and xls; and image formats like jpeg, bmp and gif, in greyscale.

Some of the other features of the iRiver 'Story' include 2GB on-board flash memory and an SD card slot, for adding 32GB storage, to accommodate nearly 1500 books. The device's optional Wi-Fi facilitates the content loading process by connecting to the user's computer via USB 2.0.

Furthermore, the £230-priced iRiver 'Story' also features a voice recorder and headphone jack, along with a built-in speaker that can not only play music or an audiobook, but can also continue playback while a reader reads the on-screen content.


Latest News

Rise in Russian Arms Sales In spite of a Drop Globally
PetSmart Sells itself with an $8.3Billion Deal
Falling Oil Prices Result in a Drop in Stocks
Shares of Amaya Fall Due to Probe Conducted by Securities Regulators
Americans Consumers Display Confidence In the Market with Gain in Sales
It’s Time to Hurry Up to Enrol in the First Phase of Affordable Care Act Health
After Merger with Alliance Boots,	Walgreen CEO will Retire
Falling Fuel Prices Lift Airline Profits But No Respite in Fares Expected
Citigroup to Pay Likely $2.7B as Legal Charge
Michael Jeffries Retires as the CEO of Abercrombie & Fitch
Deutsche Bank in Trouble Again in the U.S. for Alleged Tax Scheme
Popular Demand Brings French Toast Crunch Back on the Shelves