EPIC complains to FTC about Facebook’s changes to privacy policy

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EPIC complains to FTC about Facebook’s changes to privacy policy

Noting that the recent changes made by Facebook to its users’ privacy policy will make too much user information available to the public, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) – a group that backs Internet privacy – filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) on Thursday.

Ever since the roll out of the changes to Facebook’s privacy policy, there has been widespread criticism that the social networking site has opened up the hitherto-veiled personal details of the users to the public eye.

The biggest resentment against the changes introduced is that the default privacy setting on the site now unveils the users’ status updates to the whole Web, in case no proactive steps have been taken to amend the settings.

In its complaint to the FTC, EPIC has alleged that the Facebook privacy changes “violate user expectations, diminish user privacy, and contradict Facebook's own representations.”

In a statement, EPIC executive director Marc Rotenberg said: “More than 100 million people in the United States subscribe to the Facebook service. The company should not be allowed to turn down the privacy dial on so many American consumers.”

Meanwhile, with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg having previously said that regional networks are becoming too large to ensure users’ privacy, Facebook has contended that the implementation of the recent changes would help users “personalize the audience for each piece of content they share.”


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