New Zealand Blood Banks to Ban Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients from Donating Blood

New Zealand Blood Banks to Ban Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients from Donating B

It has been revealed that New Zealand's blood banks intend on rejecting donors with a history of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

This prohibition ensues after researchers abroad raised alarm about the possibility of the spreading of a newly discovered virus XMRV through blood transfusions.

It is reported that XMRV is a retrovirus. A retrovirus is one that inserts its genetic map into the cells it infects. This can garner a number of effects like killing the cell or triggering malignant multiplication by altering its genetic makeup.

This virus was identified for the first time in prostate cancers in 2006. Since then, the virus has been found in 27% of such tumors, especially aggressive tumors.

Now, there is also contradictory evidence, which is linked to chronic fatigue syndrome. It is also known as ME in New Zealand. It is reported that there are around 20,000 people who are afflicted with the syndrome. Moreover, there is already a lifetime ban in place against donation of blood by CFS patients, in Canada.

This preventive measure was taken earlier this month since U. S. researchers revealed that the retrovirus may transfer through infected blood.