Florida’s premature birth rate slightly jumps to 10% in 2015

Florida’s premature birth rate slightly jumps to 10% in 2015

The rate of premature births in Florida jumped slightly from 9.9 per cent in 2014 to 10 per cent in 2015, earning the state grade 'C' on newly released March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card.

A premature or preterm birth occurs when a child is born earlier than 37 weeks of pregnancy. Usually, a pregnancy lasts around 40 weeks. A baby born prematurely gets less time to develop in the mother's womb.

Dr. Karen Harris, the chairperson of the March of Dimes' Maternal/Child Health Committee in Florida, said that there are pervasive misconceptions about premature or preterm births and how to trim down one's risk of a premature delivery. 

Speaking on the topic, Dr. Harris added, "People think that sometimes prematurity is just destined to happen, but we know that if women get healthy before pregnancy and optimize their health with getting their chronic medical conditions under control if they have high blood pressure and diabetes, and they're at a great weight."

Dr. Harris also stressed that having a baby every year is not a good idea because it puts too much burden on the mother's body. 

The United States, as a whole, saw its rate of premature birth rate soaring from 9.57 per cent in 2014 to 9.63 per cent in 2015. With nearly 2,000 premature births last year, the nation also earned "C" grade on March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card.

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